Danabati Mukhaiya

Her name is Danabati Mukhaiya and she lives in Belbari Municipality in Nepal’ s Morang district.

Danabati is 35 years old and she was born like this. She is married and has one child, but she left her husband because he was an alcoholic and drug addict. Somebody is helping her child to be able to afford going to school. Danabati does not have a regular job so she has to ask people for money to live. Her life is tough in every way but she always smiles – in spite of her many problems.

Bansi Devi Chhaudhari

Her name is Bansi Devi Chhaudhari. She lives in Mohanpur village of Saptahari district in Nepal. She is 86, and she has lost her husband and two sons already.

She was crying while she was telling me her story, and my eyes got watery, too. Banso has spent all her life in that village and worked hard to look after her family. Now she is old and her children are grown up, too, but she does not receive enough care and love.

Sometimes I think life is just not fair. This woman has spent all her life for her family, and there are many ama (mothers) like her in Nepal. I couldn’t stop crying. But I couldn’t do anything about it, as I am currently on this march across Nepal for end of untouchability and cast discrimination. But even as I had to walk away, I called her daughter-in-law and requested her that she must look after this old lady. I tried to convince her, saying that she will be one day in that position, too. Her daughter-in-law promised me that she will look well after her and so I walked away again, on my track …

I have met so many people and they all have a story and all their stories are painful. It breaks my heart and I wish every human being would just show some morality and a kind heart. At least, look after your own old parents …

Subur Sada

Her name is Subur Sada, and she is called a Dalit (“untouchable”) in the Nepali society. Subur lives in the village Lalsaiya in Shira district of Nepal.

Her husband is missing since 5 years ago, and Subur has no idea whether he is alive or dead, as she has not heard anything from him. But she has two children and her parents-in-law and has to look after all of them. So she works in the farms of rich people in her village and earns some (but not much) money for her full days of work there.

With that money, she has to manage everything. And even though she doesn’t know her age as she can’t read or write anything – she sends her children to school, so they don’t have go through pain the way she has to now. She is a brave and beautiful woman with a lot of pain in her life … who still dares and fights to live her life.

In my blog, I share with you stories of people I meet during our Nepal Padayatra 2019 walk. Because stories show the hard reality of living in Nepal today, but also the dreams and little successes of people struggling to improve their situation.

Kancchimaya and Narkumari

That’s me with Narkumari and Kancchimaya in their coffee place 🙂

These two women are best friends since 1969 AD (Nepali year 2026 BS). That’s 50 years!! The left one name is Kancchimaya Tamang and the right one Narkumari.

They are both married but they stayed best friends and help each other out. And they have this little café together in Chandrapur, called “Chiya Pasal”.

It is not on any map, but their coffee is he best in town! When you get to Chandrapur, ask for directions to “halldarni amako chiya pasal”. That’s how the locals know it.

In other news, we’re in Chandrapur now with the Nepal Padayatra 2019 march.

Arjun Nepali

His name is Arjun Nepali, and he lives in Chuniya Hetauda. He has four kids (two daughters and two sons) and a wife, and plays the traditional Nepali drum to make a living. Basically he goes from house to house and plays, and people will give him some money.

You can see and watch him playing below 🙂

In my blog, I share with you stories of people I meet during our Nepal Padayatra 2019 walk. Because stories show the hard reality of living in Nepal today, but also the dreams and little successes of people struggling to improve their situation.

Chamar

This is Mrs. Chamar. She belongs to the Jamar caste, which is a Dalit (“untouchable”) caste and very poor. Chamar was married when she was 12 years and now has four children.

In general, women in the traditional societies of rural Nepal do not work outside of the house. However, Chamar had to find a way to support her children and family, so she took up a job as a guard for the local gaunpalika (the rural municipality, Nepal’s most local level of administration). In this society, that’s a bold and brave step for a woman!

In my blog, I share with you stories of people I meet during our Nepal Padayatra 2019 walk. Because stories show the hard reality of living in Nepal today, but also the dreams and little successes of people struggling to improve their situation.

Malaji Ansari

Malaji Ansari is a forest worker. By faith he is a Muslim. With the income from his work, he has to supply for his five children, his wife, his father and his mother. All of that just by cutting wood. You can imagine how tough his life is.

The modest hut behind Malaji is the place where he lives when working in the forest. His family lives on the other side of the river.

In my blog, I share with you stories of people I meet during our Nepal Padayatra 2019 walk. Because stories show the hard reality of living in Nepal today, but also the dreams and little successes of people struggling to improve their situation.

They call her Lathi

In my blog, I want to share stories of people I meet during our Nepal Padayatra 2019 walk. People told me so many stories already, and so far I hardly found time to tell them here. But I think stories can very well illustrate the hardships that people have to go through, much better than by describing a general problem.

So … here is the first story.

I met her in Dang district of Nepal during our Padayatra walk. She is working as a domestic helper in a hotel, and everyone only calls her Lathi. Which means “the mute one”. Yes, she cannot speak, and she also cannot hear. But she still has a proper name! It is so humiliating that people don’t even use her name … because this way, in a way she lost her identity.

Sadly, I could not find out her name. Not from her co-workers, who would only call her Lathi. And not from herself, because we do not have a common language. She knows sign language, but I don’t 🙁

Ending caste discrimination: I am determined!

I decided to give my hair as part of our campaign to end caste-based discrimination and untouchability in Nepal. It’s a sign of dedication from my side.

Here you see my comrade Homraj, who is on this campaign with me, having the honor to cut my hair:

सयौ बर्ष देखी मेरो सनुदायले भोगेको बिभेदलाइ अन्त्य गर्ने प्रण गर्दै हामीले सुरू गरेको अभियानको सार्थक न्यायका लागि मैले आजकै मितिदेखि मेराे केश जातीय विभेद र छुवाछुत अन्त्यका लागि अर्पण गर्ने निर्णय गरेकी छु । मेरो यो निर्णय दलित मुक्तिका लागि समर्पण हुनेछ । मेरो यो कदममा साथ दिनुहुने सहयात्री अभियन्ता Homraj Acharya र Ashok Darnal जीलाइ धन्यबाद !Nepal Padayatra 2019

Gepostet von Reeta Pariyar am Sonntag, 24. März 2019

Oh, and: there are so many stereotypes what it means for women to be beautiful. All of which are wrong. You see? Short hair, still beautiful!